Categories
Grad Profile People

Meet the Sports Enthusiast Who Turned to Tech

Grad Profile: Ebony James-McGrath

Meet the Sports Enthusiast Who Turned to Tech

Introducing Ebony James-McGrath, an Associate Consultant and one of the first 10 selected for Melbourne’s ARQ graduate program.

But being first is all too familiar for Ebony, a sports enthusiast who at one time considered a career in sports management. Plans soon pivoted when Ebony learned of the opportunity to work in the tech industry.

Learn why Ebony chose ARQ and her personal aspirations for the grad program.

What made you apply for and choose ARQ as your next career move?

I knew ARQ was making a huge investment in their graduate recruits to make them the best consultants they can be by providing training, opportunities and resources. I really enjoy learning and saw it as the ideal opportunity for me.

I thought the 10-week bootcamp was a great approach to the program, easing us in before launching into the “real world” of ARQ. It turned out to be a great opportunity to grow, get to know my peers, and to be involved and exposed to different areas of the business.

Name 3 things that you have learnt at school or past jobs that will be useful during your time with ARQ?

  1. I firmly believe that “to assume is to…”, you know the rest!
    I never assume anything. In my mind, not knowing isn’t a bad thing. Asking questions is so important, even if you think you sound silly, you never know how many people in a room had the exact same question and were just too afraid to ask.

  2. I’ve avoided working in silos whenever possible. It might sound cliché, but collaboration and teamwork is so powerful and helps produce really unique work that genuinely meets customer needs. Where possible, it’s great to reach out to your peers and managers to ask for their insight and get them involved.

  3. Finally, I’ve learnt the importance of building strong and trusted relationships with everyone. You never know what you’ll learn or what opportunities might come your way!

What’s your dream job?

The ultimate dream would be on the business/client facing side of tech. Whether that be as a connector between business and technology, account management, or being involved in the initial design meetings to understand the brief and requirements to prototype the solution. I enjoy working with others, so being able to blend my skills to provide great customer experience would be great too!

 

Share on facebook
Share this on Facebook
Share on twitter
Tweet this
Share on linkedin
Share this on Linkedin

More to explore

Meet Hadley, Evelyn and Nathan

Grad Profiles Hadley Dixon “I’ve been passionate about programming for years, so it only made sense to pursue software development and study

Categories
Data

MultiValue Databases Explained

MultiValue Databases Explained

If you recognise the names Don Nelson or Dick Pick – congratulations – you’re part of an exclusive club of experts who understand the power of MultiValue databases.

But if those names don’t ring a bell, you’re (still) in the right place, for you’re about to uncover why MultiValue databases are so popular today, more than 50 years on.

What is a MultiValue Database?

MultiValue database is a type of NoSQL and multidimensional database, often referred to as a Pick database – eponymously named after one of the lead developers: Richard A. (Dick) Pick. MultiValue databases are also known as NF2, non-first normal form systems.

In defining MultiValue database systems, it’s important to state what they aren’t: a conventional relational database. And while MultiValue systems share many similarities to relational databases, their schemas are less rigid. That means MultiValue databases can assign more than one value to a single attribute.

MultiValue databases are often categorised with MUMPS within the category of post-relational databases, despite the data model pre-dating the relational model. But unlike SQL-DBMS tools, most MultiValue databases can operate with or without SQL.

What are the Advantages of MultiValue Databases? 

The tabular structure of MultiValue databases allows multiple values for attributes whereas relational databases store one fact within a table cell. Everything possible in a relational database is possible in MultiValue, but with the added advantage of storing multi-dimensional data. The multiple value advantage of MultiValue is one of many reasons why they are a popular choice with large data sets typical in large enterprise and government.

Big data analytics tend to run faster and easier on MultiValue systems due to flexibility when dealing with complex data structures. MultiValue databases can manage certain data structures that conventional relational databases find complex. Decades of big data commonly found within large financial institutions and government agencies are why MultiValue databases offer inexpensive data solutions compared to relational database solutions.

MultiValue versus Relational Model 

The following diagram is a hospital’s application for controlling their ambulances. When modelling the call logging and dispatch elements using the relational model, the process equates to nine database tables with fifteen interdependencies.

Applying the same with the MultiValue model creates an application with just four database tables and six interdependencies. 

MultiValue’s simplicity offers efficiencies with economic advantage compared to the relational model. The complexity of the relational model results in higher development and maintenance costs with an increased risk probability of error.

Who are the MultiValue Vendors? 

  • Rocket U2 (UniVerse and UniData)
  • OpenInsight by Revelation
  • OpenQM by Ladybridge Systems
  • NPS Reality by Northgate-IS
  • Caché by InterSystems

MultiValue Superpowers and their Kryptonite

Many MultiValue database system developers will readily confess that accessing MultiValue data is a challenge – especially in real-time. Faced with disconnected information silos and the need to write dictionaries, all while maintaining application vendor support agreements are MultiValue shortcomings.

“You just can’t access the data” or “how to get to my MultiValue database information” is commonly heard across MultiValue database system users. The data is locked up in legacy data systems with limited support and data tools. 

Extracting meaningful and timely business intelligence has been the greatest challenge. Engaging relational thinking with MultiValue data has been the greatest challenge to date. Companies have tried with in-house developers or vendor promises to unlock MultiValue data. Most have yet to find a feasible solution that doesn’t require millions and months to accomplish.

MultiValue developers can’t simply rewrite the tools or analytics, and retraining of key staff isn’t an overnight solution that’s feasible for the now. All the tooling, visualisation and ways of conducting analysis across data is predominately written by developers who understand relational databases, writing for relational models.

The simplest way to achieve the desired outcome is to take MultiValue data and put it into a format that allows accessibility by those who need it.

The benefit of doing so means you won’t have to implement costly replacement or migration programs for your core systems. There’s no business disruption and you can extend the return on your investment in your systems. This gives you the ability to process and analyse your information in different ways that you couldn’t before.

How Do I Access My MultiValue Data?

With ARQ Fuse – a managed service that allows the data-impaired to see everything.

ARQ Fuse lifts the veil on dark data-impairment so you can say goodbye to your disconnected information silos. Unite your scattered data puddles into centralised data lakes with integrated data domains for on demand visibility across your entire organisation.

ARQ Fuse enables a single point of conformed data-truth with the confidence of governance for data-driven decisions at pace. Ask new data and analytic questions across your full data set and get answers in real-time, unlike never before.

ARQ Fuse works by applying non-MultiValue information governance and non-MultiValue data handling techniques to resolve the MultiValue paradigm. Normalising your MultiValue database is the secret sauce of our intellectual property that empowers you to choose any data analytical platform to gain fresh new insights from your MultiValue data.

Watch the 54 second video on how ARQ Fuse normalises your data:

Visit the ARQ Fuse page to learn how you can break free from the crawl of pace from traditional MultiValue systems and get real-time business intelligence dashboards, competitive advantage from digital transformation and the ability to migrate all your data to the cloud.

Steve McCormick

Chief Customer Architect

ARQ Group

Share on facebook
Share this on Facebook
Share on twitter
Tweet this
Share on linkedin
Share this on Linkedin

More to explore

Meet Hadley, Evelyn and Nathan

Grad Profiles Hadley Dixon “I’ve been passionate about programming for years, so it only made sense to pursue software development and study

Categories
Grad Profile People

How a Trip to Europe Changed My Destiny

Grad Profile: Pip Wheaton

How a Trip to Europe Changed My Destiny

Pip Wheaton is part of the graduate program’s first cohort. Having started her career in infographic design, Pip joined ARQ to explore the bountiful opportunities the tech industry offers.

We asked Pip her expectations from the grad program and what led her to this point in her career. Here’s what Pip said:

What made you apply for and choose ARQ as your next career move?

When I finished school I thought I wanted to do something in design. After a study tour to Europe (when travel was still a thing), that all changed. On the study tour we designed infographics for start-ups and I soon realised that I had a real passion for helping businesses leverage design in different ways to be more efficient.

When I returned from my travels I changed my majors from Marketing & Comms Design (the standard double degree everyone was doing at the time) to Entrepreneurship & Innovation and UX Design. This was a NEW major that had never been done before – I was SO excited!

After graduating, I chose the ARQ grad program because it would allow me to leverage my background in consulting and use design principles to solve tech problems. Plus, I could feel the start-up culture oozing through the screen and knew it just felt right.

What are three goals you wish to achieve at ARQ this year?

I’ve got quite a long list, but a few include:
  • Travel! – COVID restrictions permitting, I’m desperate to start travelling again even if it’s just interstate. I can’t wait to meet the teams in Brisbane and Sydney in person and continue learning from the talented teams we have at ARQ. I’m keen to work with clients across the country (even the globe) to show them new ways of working.
  • Professional skills – I want to work to craft my own personal style of visual facilitation for clients. I’m keen to learn how to synthesise and present complex information in an accessible visual or graphic format.
  • Networking – Again if COVID permits, I’m looking forward to attending in-person conferences and professional events, rather than dialling in via Zoom. I miss connecting with new people outside my bubble and a conference is the perfect opportunity.
What’s something you want to share with students looking for graduate programs?

Find your superpower and use it to define your personal brand. It’s what makes you unique, celebrate it. 😊

What’s your dream job or a future goal you’ve set yourself?

My ultimate dream goal is to find the space within the UX Design and Consulting worlds that I can define and live up to – potentially in the form of a role that doesn’t exist yet. I’d love to develop my personal portfolio and be known as the best in the business for my skillset.
Share on facebook
Share this on Facebook
Share on twitter
Tweet this
Share on linkedin
Share this on Linkedin

More to explore

Meet Hadley, Evelyn and Nathan

Grad Profiles Hadley Dixon “I’ve been passionate about programming for years, so it only made sense to pursue software development and study

Categories
Grad Profile People

From Travel(ling the World) To Tech

Grad Profile: Bence Fulop

From Travel(ling the World) To Tech

Bence Fulop is part of the graduate program’s first cohort. Having started out his career in international travel, Bence has joined the ARQ team to seek a “fresh start” and learn all about what the tech sector has to offer.

We asked Bence some questions about what he is looking to get out of the program, and what has led him to this point in his career. Here’s what he said:

What made you apply for and choose ARQ as your next career move?

Before ARQ I was working in the travel industry for eight years. I fell into this job by accident (originally, I thought I wanted to be an ambassador for Australia!) but I loved every minute of working in international travel and got to learn and grow a lot.

I’d wanted to see what it was like to work for a bigger company for a while, so when I saw ARQ’s grad program I was really excited for the opportunity of a fresh start in the tech industry. I also knew it would be a great way to learn from industry leaders and professionals and work closely with mentors.

What are three goals you wish to achieve at ARQ this year?

I really want to be comfortable working on production code bases. This is an area that specifically interests me, and I can’t wait to learn more.

As I said, I’m also looking forward to working with a great mentor at ARQ. There’s so much to learn from everyone here and I want to take it all in as much as possible.

On a more personal note, I have a few fitness goals this year: 1) run 1000kms, 2) complete 4 gym sessions per week and 3) complete a spartan race. Wish me luck!!

What outcomes would you like to see from this experience for the next step of your career?

I’d like to gain enough technical skills to either oversee a department or start my very own tech business. Watch this space!

Share on facebook
Share this on Facebook
Share on twitter
Tweet this
Share on linkedin
Share this on Linkedin

More to explore

Meet Hadley, Evelyn and Nathan

Grad Profiles Hadley Dixon “I’ve been passionate about programming for years, so it only made sense to pursue software development and study

Categories
Digital Experience

5 Proven Strategies to Achieve Rapid CX ROI

5 Proven Strategies to Achieve Rapid CX ROI

Measuring and communicating the business value of CX initiatives is a top priority. It’s also a challenge for leaders across organisations. There is widespread acknowledgement that customer obsession and improved CX has a direct positive topline impact on your organisation. But the CX process is still evolving when it comes to elevating and communicating this impact. Without a strategic approach, this can become a beast to manage, especially for larger enterprise organisations 

 

Behold the five proven strategies we’ve seen work with our enterprise partners. These strategies transcend beyond transforming your CX through award winning products and services – successfully capturing and communicating measurable business impact. When done right, CX reimagination can be a fun and exciting journey with fascinating commercial benefits for the organisation. But beware – the risks can be high if it’s not thoughtfully planned.  

 

01 Who is Your Ultimate Customer?  

 

The first port of call is achieving an intimate understanding of your customer(s). Who are your customers and will you need to target specific segments? Hint: These might be existing in your business as customer segmentation, personas, or customer clusters, but the common pitfall is having multiple definitions of these for the different parts of the business.  

 

Consolidating and reviewing any available analytic insights across the different customer touchpoints (such as digital products, sales interactions, and customer care channels) help form prioritised views on different customer segments. Having insightful optics across all your customer segments goes a long way in knowing optimal CX initiatives to accelerate quality outcomes.  

 

02 Establish Your Unified Customer Voice 

 

One of the key lifecycle artefacts powering the continuity of your CX roadmap is the visualisation of end-to-end business lifecycle (from your customers’ perspective). Methods such as journey maps and service interaction maps help establish a common source of understanding, enabling your entire organisation to appreciate not just what works well in the current systembut more importantly, map pain points, gaps, and opportunities. When extended to overlay customer feedback, UX metrics such as struggle scores and drop off rates help prioritise high impact CX initiatives.  

 

In a way, such unified mapping of the current state establishes empathy within the organisation and goes a long way in evolving a customercentric mindset.   

 

Such collaborative activities reinforce the internal cultural evolution of CX within the organisation. More importantly, it breaks down the silos that may exist across design, engineering and product teams across numerous business units. CX is beyond design, given technology is your direct enabler for any new capabilities you’ll build. And what better way to unite the right people from the cross section of the organisation to define your future!   

 

03 If You’re Not Solving the Right Challenge, Forget ROI  

 

Most organisations have one (or other forms) of customer personas and journey maps, but the real value of the customer research comes to life when you leverage the CX magic word: “alignment”.  The true value of CX outcome not realised until we deliver business outcomes. Having a clear grasp of the organisational north starboth tactical and long term – now helps identify and prioritise the right challenge to combat first. Techniques such as JTBD (Jobs To Be Done) help strike this balance between user needs and business goals.   

Clarity on CX priorities means a razor-sharp view on the ‘what’. This facilitates the ‘how’ which is all about creative ways of problem solving. The last decade has seen a good evolution in the space of design thinking methods. With the right lean and iterative techniques, it’s all about finding the right solution fit for purpose for both the business and your customers.  

 

By identifying core CX challenges needing solutions, and adopting a user-centred design approach, the order fulfilment unit of a retail partner achieved 40% time savings and 20% reduction in call volumes.  

  

04 Embrace Metrics  

 

CX initiatives without a quantification mindset will result in being at squareone. Quantifying a range of parameters for the product, service, customers, and the business, means you not only get better at prioritising problems to solve, but also better measure and track outcomes, post rollout 

 

Organisations with growth mindset have successfully adopted methods such as A/B testing frameworks. The result? Empowered teams able to continuously improve and enhance the customer experience across the board. This testandlearn mindset also means organisations can take data informed decisions for future investments.     

Partnering with a global airline to develop a real-time service health dashboard for a newly launched automated customer connect platform. Providing business teams with valuable insights on the key CX metrics. Enabling ongoing refinements and leading a data informed service decision making.”  

 

05 Design for Business Outcomes  

 

As much as organisations strive to be customer centric, ensuring that we are designing for the success of the business is the single biggest void in the current industry CX workflow. This offers the opportunity for the UX and Design community to evolve from designing just for users (and being the voice of the user in the room) to designing for the needs of both users and the business. 

  

Teams that are able to strike this balance will make all the difference when it comes to successful CX outcomes. The recent rise of UX metrics, design measurement and strategic design roles (beyond UI design and interaction design) are a result of this need. It’s envisaged this space is slated to mature and strengthen in the next two to three years.  

 

To capitalise upon the trend, leaders need to assemble the right CX team to lead the change. Assembling teams with a mix of skills across customer empathy, behavioural science, service, and product design, with strategic business acumen.  

 

Globally, only 17% of design teams are actively measuring impact.”  

Forrester Business Impact of Experience Design 2020  

 

Finally, Tell Better Stories 

  

Results speak for themselves. Show action through iterative roll outs. Have a cadence of CX ROI reporting. Elevate the impact. Demonstrate value. Highlight the business stats. Delight the execs as well as customers. And this will go a long way in advancing the focus on CX.  

 

Read more about how we partner with brands to transform customer experiences by combining the best of design thinking, user centred design and data and analytics 

 

  • Digital channel experience strategy and design: Aware Super   
  • CX reimagination for a new business line offering: Transurban  

 

Want to lift your game in CX while booking measurable business outcomes?  

Let’s talkor connect with me on LinkedIn

 

Shriman Kalyan  

Director, Digital Experience 

ARQ Group

Share on facebook
Share this on Facebook
Share on twitter
Tweet this
Share on linkedin
Share this on Linkedin

More to explore

Meet Hadley, Evelyn and Nathan

Grad Profiles Hadley Dixon “I’ve been passionate about programming for years, so it only made sense to pursue software development and study

Categories
Data

Tailored Data Governance: Your Why and What Matters

Tailored Data Governance: Your Why and What Matters

Lawrence Eva, Principal Consultant, Data & Analytics

Data governance is a hot topic of discussion with ARQ’s customers and clients. Yet surprisingly, many conversations share a common theme: 

“With several attempts at data governance for our business, nothing seems to stick.” 

Data governance has become more important than ever. The amount of data being used in business is increasing exponentially. With data being used to drive critical business processes, governance still remains a challenge for many companies.

So why is data governance so hard to get right on the first attempt? 

As the ARQ Group’s Principal Consultant for Data and Analytics, I have seen many times data management teams spend months – if not years – writing slick policies and procedures covering every use case and scenario before trying to apply those policies to the business. 

The focus on every scenario can send data management teams down a rabbit hole, where timelines creep up on the team. This results in change management and embedding activities becoming squeezed. Many of the key players in the financial industry fell into this trap when regulatory pressure forced them to start data governance programs without fully tailoring said programs to the culture of the company or desired outcomes.

Rather than focus on the theory of data governance, perhaps focus on the application of data governance. Remember what you are implementing are rules and regulations – and like all rules and regulations – unless there’s clarity on the WHY, and your people accept and agree, pushback may ensue. This can sometimes amount to frustration, and worst case: rebellion (or at least non-compliance). 

Your WHY is key, but also needs to be balanced by WHAT you are implementing. By WHAT, the level of data governance (rules and regulations ) you’ll be implementing. If you’re implementing a complex set of stringent data governance policies, your WHY needs to be rock solid! 

Alternatively if your approach is to progressively implement a set of simple guidelines, your WHY can also be simple, and gain strength as the business enjoys positive results from your guidelines. 

Never has this balance been more evident as seen in the world’s handling of COVID 19. An initial strict lockdown in Australia was accepted because the WHY was so compelling – lockdown or face COVID19 spread like wildfire with deaths imminent. 

Would Australia have accepted a lockdown if the stakes were not so high? 

The initial WHY is so important, because it’s the point you’re asking people to comply with only the promise of favourable outcomes. As time progresses, if your data governance rollout is successful, your people will see evidence in the benefits of compliance, and likely to follow your policies and procedures. 

Again, we saw this behaviour in COVID19 – by December 2020, an entire lockdown of New South Wale’s Sydney Northern Beaches was accepted. The WHY was accepted during a peak social time (Christmas and New Years), because the results of non-compliance were evident in other countries who had not controlled their outbreaks (as well as Australia).

Getting back to your WHY. How are you going to convince all levels of your organisation that data governance needs to be implemented? 

Your first step is to align with the leaders of your organisation and understand why data governance is important to them. Sometimes this can be easy, where external factors such as regulatory pressure, are top of mind thoughts for the leadership team. At other times you will need to go through a number of possible benefits/drivers to understand what resonates. Benefits/Drivers could be:

  • Productivity – The business has a large workforce of people using data, often inefficiently and in a duplicative manner. Data governance can help streamline and ensure data is used and processed once for multiple uses, reducing overall costs
  • Alignment/Agreement – Different areas of the business may calculate key business metrics differently, which in turn could drive different business actions. Data governance can ensure that a CEO does not receive two conflicting versions of key information, and defines who is accountable in the business for that information
  • Value – Data may be underutilised in the business, perhaps by the accessibility or quality of data, and your business may not be extracting as much value as it could of, out of data driven initiatives
  • Regulatory/Audit as described previously

Once you’ve agreed the WHY with your senior leaders, be clear on the funding and sponsorship they are willing to provide to implement. Resonating is one thing, putting up the investment needed is another. 

Data Governance is not easy and requires hours of work, either from new resources the business will need to fund, or by adding work to resources who are already performing a full time job. When companies refer to failed data governance rollouts, many times this is the reason – companies spend the time to write the data governance policies and procedures, but don’t invest in the capacity for the people on the ground to follow the procedures of data governance, and the whole thing falls apart.

So now you have the WHY and the sponsorship, you can start to shape the WHAT.

Here the key is tailoring the WHAT to your companies specific WHY and funding (hint: here’s where a consulting company like ARQ can help). 

Having been through this process multiple times, we know that if your key WHY is productivity and making data more accessible, a compliance heavy program centred around Collibra and requiring all data decisions to be made by a central data governance office is probably not the model that will engage your business. 

Conversely if the key WHY is being compliant with your regulators, a light touch governance process, focussing more on agility may not be the best model. Throw in other key factors such as the culture of your business (i.e are they a command based culture, where edicts from the top are largely followed, or is it more of a collaborative culture where employees are encouraged to innovate) and it is clear that tailoring a data governance solution for your company is the only way to go. 

Our work at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) has started on this journey and very cognisant of the above factors, which we believe will lead to a successful rollout over the coming months and years.

If you want to talk data governance and not sure where to start, the ARQ Group can help.

I’m Lawrence Eva, Principal Consultant of Data & Analytics at ARQ Group. You can connect with me on LinkedIn and I’ll show you how to get started on a sensible, simply and low-risk approach to your data governance. 

Alternatively, visit our contact page and leave your details. We’ll get back to you with the quickness.

Share on facebook
Share this on Facebook
Share on twitter
Tweet this
Share on linkedin
Share this on Linkedin

More to explore

Meet Hadley, Evelyn and Nathan

Grad Profiles Hadley Dixon “I’ve been passionate about programming for years, so it only made sense to pursue software development and study

Categories
Announcements

ARQ Group’s Diaxion Acquisition Creates Australia’s Only Full-Service Technology, Data and Digital Consultancy

ARQ Group’s Diaxion Acquisition Creates Australia’s Only Full-Service Technology, Data and Digital Consultancy

Today we’re excited to announce ARQ Group is acquiring Diaxion – one of Australia’s leading technology consultancies. The acquisition unites two of the country’s leading technology companies to create Australia’s only full-service technology, data, AI, cloud and digital consultancy providing advisory, delivery and operate/managed services.  

ARQ customers now have access to the full spectrum of technological capabilities required to modernise and optimise their organisation – all onshore – and creating local jobs in one of the fastest growing industries: digital and technology. Diaxion are an Australian technology success story that began in 2000. Today Diaxion are a market leading, technology consultancy with an impressive portfolio of clients: state and federal government and ASX-200 companies, including the big four banks. 

ARQ Group CEO Tristan Sternson said Diaxion’s market leading technology consultancy and digital transformation expertise naturally complements ARQ Group’s specialist capabilities in data analytics, artificial intelligence, and process automation.

The company continued to grow rapidly over 2020, with Diaxion identified as the ideal company to fuel the continued expansion. Arq added more than 150 new employees over the course of last year, despite the pandemic, and has already seen revenue growth of 25% in 2021.

After successfully winning numerous government tenders and projects with a range of federal agencies, we were keen to strengthen ARQ Group’s footprint into Canberra.

Diaxion’s extensive experience working with federal departments, along with our existing Canberra offices, will provide ARQ Group with the opportunity to offer a wider suite of services to public sector agencies. “Importantly, there will be no redundancies from the acquisition, and we’re excited to welcome the entire Diaxion team into the growing ARQ Group family,” Sternson said.

Simon Pither, Partner of Quadrant Private Equity and Chairman of ARQ Group celebrated the acquisition and said that 2020 was an incredible year of growth, despite the impacts of COVID-19.

  “When we first invested in ARQ Group last year, we did so because we saw the huge digital transformation tasks ahead for many Australian companies and Governments and knew ARQ Group was ideally positioned to help bridge that technical chasm.

Due to COVID-19, that digital transformation has moved faster than we initially anticipated, but I’m proud how the ARQ Group team has responded and continued, delivering incredible results for its customers.   “The combination of ARQ Group and Diaxion creates Australia’s only home-grown, full-service digital, data, cloud, and tech advisory company,” Pither said.

Diaxion becomes part of ARQ Group, which was acquired by Australian Private Equity firm Quadrant in partnership with the Management Team led by Tristan Sternson in February 2020, and the combined business will have more than 450 employees.

ARQ Group continues to seek further acquisition opportunities that will strengthen the business, expand ARQ’s geographic footprint, and provide customers new and expanded data, digital, and tech offerings.

Share on facebook
Share this on Facebook
Share on twitter
Tweet this
Share on linkedin
Share this on Linkedin

More to explore

Meet Hadley, Evelyn and Nathan

Grad Profiles Hadley Dixon “I’ve been passionate about programming for years, so it only made sense to pursue software development and study